Puppy & Kitten Vaccinations
Vaccine & Vials

When puppies and kittens are first born, they have no immunity at all. The first milk that their mother feeds them is special milk called colostrum. In this milk, the mother passes on some of her immunity to the puppies and kittens.


This is called passive immunity and protects for various periods of time – some diseases may have no protection after five weeks, others may be protected against until the puppies and kittens are sixteen weeks or older.


Vaccination of puppies and kittens can begin at any age but because of the passive immunity provided by their mothers, there is little point giving any vaccinations before six weeks of age because the mothers’ immunity will destroy the vaccine and stop it from working.


In this practice we begin the vaccination process from about seven or eight weeks onwards, eight being preferred. This vaccine may provide no protection at all, but it will use up some the mothers’ passive immunity. We then give another dose of vaccine at twelve weeks of age. At twelve weeks the chances that the passive immunity is still effective is very poor so this vaccine has an excellent chance of providing protection.


Some vaccine manufacturers state that the final dose of their vaccine can be given at ten weeks of age. In some individual puppies and kittens this may be true, but it is estimated that in 20% (that’s one in five), this early vaccination does not work. We think this is too high a risk to take, and hence we give our final vaccine no earlier than 12 weeks of age.


In our puppy vaccination course there are seven diseases that we normally vaccinate against which are as follows:


Distemper
Hepatitis – (two types)
Parvovirus
Leptospirosis – (two types)
Parainfluenza


There are two other vaccines that can be given to puppies. They are Rabies and Kennel Cough. Unless you intend to take your pet abroad there is no need to vaccinate against rabies in the UK. Kennel cough, however, is a common disease but unlike those listed above is not life-threatening. If contracted it is a real nuisance and a protracted problem and it is wise to protect against it. If you are intending to put your pet into a kennels while you go on holiday, the kennel owners will insist that this vaccine is given before accepting your pet. Kennel cough can be contracted from the streets just as easily as from kennels.

We have a video about vaccinations but it is meant primarily for the situation in the USA. It does contain useful information. If you want to see it click here. Corona virus and Lyme disease is not a problem in UK. Leptospirosis (Contracted from infected dogs and rats) is very much more important in the UK.


In our kitten vaccination course there are four diseases that we normally vaccinate against which are as follows:


Infectious enteritis (also known as "panleucopaenia" this is actually a parvovirus).
Cat Influenza (We vaccinate against the two most serious viruses).
Leukaemia
Again rabies vaccine can be used to protect cats but is not necessary in the United Kingdom.

We also have a video about vaccinations but it is meant primarily for the situation in theUSA. It does contain useful information. If you want to see it click here. This video mentions an FIP vaccine (Feline Infectious Peritonitis). This disease does occur in UK and is common. The vaccine is not available here and is thought not to be very effective.

Cost of Puppy and dog vaccination